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  • 2018 President, Kevin McDonald

    I am extremely honored to serve as the next President of the Placer County Association of REALTORS. I am incredibly thankful to have the guidance of the amazing past PCAR Presidents, leadership, staff and all those who have helped to Read More
  • Honorary Member - Gloria Doze

    Gloria Doze was honored with the 2017 Honorary Member of the Year award at this years Board of Directors Installation. The Honorary Membership is an award given to a member of the Placer County Association of REALTORS who has been a member Read More
  • REALTOR of the Year - Kim Tucker

    Kim Tucker was honored with the 2017 REALTOR of the Year award at this year's Board of Directors Installation. The REALTOR of the Year award is the highest honor given to a REALTOR member of the Placer County Association of REALTORS. Read More
  • Affiliate of the Year - Dan Morasci

    Dan Morasci was honored with the 2017 Affiliate of the Year award at this years Board of Directors Installation. The Affiliate of the Year award is the highest honor given to an Affiliate member of the Placer County Association of REALTORS. The Read More
  • REALTOR Action Fund Video

    Why should you support the REALTOR Action Fund? How do your RAF contributions make a difference? Who advocates on your behalf? Watch this video to find out how your RAF contributions are used locally, statewide and nationally... Read More
  • PCAR MEMBERS MAKING A DIFFERENCE

    Did you know that in the past 5 years PCAR REALTORS have donated a total of $212,750.00 to local charities? PCAR REALTORS not only work in Placer County, they give back by volunteering their time, resources and money. For more Read More
  • PCAR Angel Tree Complete!

    PCAR members show their true colors once again! Because of your incredible generosity, 40 children in Placer County will be able to open some incredible presents on Christmas morning! Thank you for all of your continued support and desire to Read More
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Model Behavior for Staying Safe at Model Homes

03 Aug 2010
Showing a model home can put you in a very vulnerable situation. You are, most likely, all alone in an uninhabited residence—and everyone who cares to stop in will be aware of this. So follow these four tips to help stay safe: 1. If possible, always try to have at least one other person working with you at the home. 2. When a person comes through the office to view a model home, have them complete a guest register that includes their full name, address, phone number, e-mail, and vehicle information. 3. Keep your cell phone and your car keys with you at all times. Keep your handbag locked in the trunk of your vehicle. 4. When closing the model homes for the night, never assume that the home is vacant. Check the interior of the house prior to locking the doors, working from the top floor to the bottom, back of the house to the front, locking the doors behind you. Be familiar enough with each home to know the exits. Be aware of your surroundings. Be prepared to protect yourself. (Sources: City of Mesa, AZ) Visit NAR’s REALTOR® Safety Web site at www.REALTOR.org/Safety This article is part of the NATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF REALTORS®’ REALTOR® Safety Resources Kit.

Fight or Flight? Consider the Best Response to a Physical Attack

03 Aug 2010
If you were to find yourself alone in a property with a client who indicated they wanted to harm you or rob you, what would you do? Would you put up a fight or try to escape? It isn’t pleasant to think about, but it’s important to know the facts. Experts agree that when escape is an option, that is the route you should take. Remember, your primary goal in any incident is to escape from the danger and call for help. When faced with menacing behavior, you should first try to find a discreet way of removing yourself from the situation. Try to avoid triggering the emotion a predator might use to justify an attack. For example, you can say that you need to step outside to make a phone call and then don’t come back inside. If an attack does occur, trust yourself and stay as calm as possible. Think rationally and evaluate your options. There is no single right way to respond to a confrontation, because each situation is different. Your response should depend on the circumstances: the location of the attack, your personal resources, the characteristics of your assailant and the presence of weapons. There are many strategies that are effective, but you must rely on your own judgment to choose the best one. No resistance: Not resisting can be the proper choice in a given situation. An attacker with a gun or a knife may put you in a situation where you think it is safer to do what he or she says. If someone tries to rob you, give up your property, not your life. Stalling for time: Appear to go along with the attacker. This might give you time to assess the situation. When his guard is down, try to escape. Distraction and then flight: Obviously you should try to get away, but whether you can depends on many things, including your shoes and clothing, physical stamina, the terrain and your proximity to your attacker. Verbal assertiveness: If someone is coming toward you, hold out your hands in front of you and yell “Stop!” or “Stay back!” Criminals have been known to leave a victim alone if he or she yelled or showed that he or she was not afraid to fight back. Physical resistance: If you decide to respond physically, remember that your first response should be to flee the area or the home. Act quickly and decisively to throw the attacker off guard while you get away. Your personal safety is your first priority. Property can be replaced, but the value of your life and health is beyond measure. Also, you should familiarize yourself with your state’s laws concerning self-defense, including the issue of what is proper or improper use of force to defend yourself during an attack. Observation: Be sure to make an effort to get an accurate description of your attacker. Even the smallest details may give authorities a clue to finding the suspect. (Sources: Washington Real Estate Safety Council) Visit NAR’s REALTOR® Safety Web site at www.REALTOR.org/Safety This article is part of the NATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF REALTORS®’ REALTOR® Safety Resources Kit.

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