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  • 2017 President, Debbie Newton

    Licensed since 1999 and a REALTOR member of PCAR since 2000, Debbie has followed in her father and past PCAR President, Joe Newtons footsteps by plugging into the Association and becoming very well known in the real estate community. “I’m Read More
  • PCAR REALTORS "MAKING A DIFFERENCE IN PLACER COUNTY"

    Did you know that in the past 5 years PCAR REALTORS have donated a total of $212,750.00 to local charities? PCAR REALTORS not only work in Placer County, they give back by volunteering their time, resources and money. For more Read More
  • Honorary Member-Alicia Higgins-Lewis

    Alicia Higgins-Lewis was honored with the 2016 Honorary Member of the Year award at this years Board of Directors Installation. The Honorary Membership is an award given to a member of the Placer County Association of REALTORS who has been a member of Read More
  • Affiliate of the Year-Marc Fletcher

    Marc Fletcher was honored with the 2016 Affiliate of the Year award at this years Board of Directors Installation. The Affiliate of the Year award is the highest honor given to an Affiliate member of the Placer County Association of REALTORS. The Read More
  • REALTOR of the Year-Geoffrey Poulos

    Geoffrey Poulos was honored with the 2016 REALTOR of the Year award at this years Board of Directors Installation. The REALTOR of the Year award is the highest honor given to a REALTOR member of the Placer County Association of REALTORS. Read More
  • REALTOR Action Fund Video

    Why should you support the REALTOR Action Fund? How do your RAF contributions make a difference? Who advocates on your behalf? Watch this video to find out how your RAF contributions are used locally, statewide and nationally... Read More
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Parking Lot Safety

03 Aug 2010
We spend a lot of time driving, and even doing work or making calls in our parked cars. As you travel from appointment to appointment, keep these tips in mind: • Don’t approach your vehicle if a van or other large vehicle with tinted windows is parked next to it. Find a security guard to walk you to your car, or look for a nearby couple walking to their car and say something like, “That vehicle wasn’t there when I parked. Would you mind making sure I get into my car safely?” • Have your key ready to open the car door. Never stand next to your car searching through your purse. Robbers, car-jackers and sexual predators all watch for this type of distraction. • Once in your car, lock the doors immediately. • Get moving. Don’t sit inside of your vehicle adjusting the stereo, rummaging through shopping bags or your purse, or talking on your phone, especially if the lot is not well populated. • If you have an unlocking button or keyless entry system, make sure you unlock only the driver door. Unlocking all doors allows a predator to simply slide into your car from the passenger side. • Make sure that your dome light is always functioning properly. As you unlock your vehicle at night, glance into the back seat and make sure that an attacker has not gained access to your car. (Source: Road and Travel magazine) Visit NAR’s REALTOR® Safety Web site at www.REALTOR.org/Safety This article is part of the NATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF REALTORS®’ REALTOR® Safety Resources Kit.

Safety Tips to Share with Sellers

03 Aug 2010
The NATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF REALTORS® and this organization have worked hard to keep REALTOR® Safety foremost in everyone’s minds. But what about your clients? They, too, face some dangers in allowing strangers into their homes or visiting other people’s properties. Share this valuable advice with everyone, and you’ll help them learn to protect themselves against crime: • Remind your clients that strangers will be walking through their home during showings or open houses. Tell them to hide any valuables in a safe place. For security’s sake, remember to remove keys, credit cards, jewelry, crystal, furs and other valuables from the home or lock them away during showings. Also remove prescription drugs. Some seemingly honest people wouldn’t mind getting their hands on a bottle of Viagra, uppers or downers. • DON’T leave personal information like mail or bills out in the open where anyone can see it. Be sure to lock down your computer and lock up your laptop and any other expensive, easy-to-pocket electronics, like iPods, before your showing. • Tell your clients not to show their home by themselves. Alert them that not all agents, buyers and sellers are who they say they are. Predators come in all shapes and sizes. We tell our children not to talk to strangers. Tell your sellers not to talk to other agents or buyers, and to refer all inquiries to you. • Instruct your clients that they are responsible for their pets. If possible, animals should be removed during showings. Make clients aware that buyers and agents are sometimes attacked, and the owner will be held liable. • At an open house, be alert to the pattern of visitors’ arrivals, especially near the end of showing hours. In some areas, a group of thieves will show up together near the end of the open house and, while a string of “potential buyers” distracts the agent, the rest of the group walks through the house, stealing any valuables they come across. • Finally, when you leave a client’s property, whether after an open house or a standard showing, make sure that all doors and windows are locked. Thieves commonly use open houses to scout for valuables and possible points of entry, then return after the agent leaves. • Let your clients know that you will take all of the above safety precautions, but that when they return home, they should immediately verify that all doors are locked and all valuables accounted for. (Source: REALTORSafety911.com; Realty Times; ThinkGlink.com) Visit NAR’s REALTOR® Safety Web site at www.REALTOR.org/Safety This article is part of the NATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF REALTORS®’ REALTOR® Safety Resources Kit.

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